I stedet for pludselige overraskelsestiltag har vi brug for en langsigtet forudsigelig nedlukningsplan, så borgere og samfundet på forhånd ved hvilke tiltag som bliver sat i værk hvis smittetallet stiger, og kan indrette sig derefter.

Alt var kaos og nyt i marts.

Skræk historier om overfyldte hospitaler i Bergamo og Madrid, og billeder af sportshaller der blev brugt som midlertidige lighuse. Politikerne i Danmark handlede konsekvent, lukkede på kort tid landet ned og indsatte en lang række restriktioner. Var alle restriktioner fuldt ud nødvendige? Og skulle man måske have indfør andre restriktioner (som e.g. mundmind) dengang? Nej og ja. Men det er altid let at være bedrevidende i bagklogskabens klare lys. Og med den viden der fandtes dengang gjorde politikerne det helt rigtige. Smittetallet faldt drastisk, der blev lavet hjælpepakker i stor stil til udsatte brancher og efter et par måneder kom landet langsomt på ret køl igen. …


Factfullness

— by Hans Rosling

“Factfulness is one of the most educational books I’ve ever read” — Bill Gates

Your first must-read book should be Factfullness by the late Swedish Professor of public health, Hans Rosling. In this outstanding book, Rosling describes how, despite all the negative media coverage, the world is actually getting better on almost all accounts — and provides a useful framework to makes sense of the world and be aware of our own biases. Especially relevant during in the current COVID-19 media storm.

If you’re only planning on reading one book during your quarantine, make sure it is this one. No book will help you better understand the world. …


“TL;DR — Quinine, the ingredient that gives Tonic Water its bitter taste is chemically very similar to Cloroquine, a drug which might have potential to fight COVID-19.”

***Disclaimer: Before you go ahead claim “fakenews”, I will do you the favour and stress that nothing in the below column have been verified, proven or otherwise endorsed by any expert, medical official or doctor.***

Neither, however, did any expert ever claim that hoarding toilet paper, closing borders or only eating instant noodles for 14 days prevented or cured COVID-19 — yet people are doing it anyway “just to be safe…”.

So in the interest of “just to be safe” — follow my unscientific and unsubstantiated claim for why Gin and Tonic might help you through the pandemic. …


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The world is changing faster than ever and the importance of maintaining an agile and adaptable mindset is key to navigating the megatrends and technological advancements that are impacting our society in the years to come. In what has been coined the fourth industrial revolution, new production methods and industries are emerging at an unprecedented speed and technologies such as autonomous vehicles, 3D printing, artificial intelligence and advanced industrial robotics all have a tremendous impact on society. These developments bring about enormous opportunities for public sector innovation, as cities and governments rethink big areas of public services from transportation to education to medical treatments. …


Creativity, complex problem solving and agility as skill has become more important than ever, and its significance is increasing rapidly. In what has been coined the 4th industrial revolution, new production methods and industries are emerging at an unprecedented speed and technologies such as autonomous vehicles, 3D printing, artificial intelligence and advanced industrial robotics all have a tremendous impact on business. In this fast-paced revolution, the phrase “business as usual” could swiftly become synonymous with companies that are too slow to change, resulting in their eminent decline.

Yet, these developments also have huge implications for the type of skills employees need in order to stay relevant. In 2015, the BBC launched a website called “Will a Robot take your job?” where visitors can browse over 100 job titles and see the likelihood of those jobs being automated by the year of 2020. Not only will jobs disappear, but many skills that are valuable in today’s world will increasingly become obsolete. The striking thing is not that robots and machines are replacing people, as this has been the case for centuries. The difference this time around is the society-wide impact. In the past, industrialization mainly caused unemployment amongst unskilled workers; this time around white-collar professions such as legal assistants and financial officers are also at risk. Consequently, jobs in the future will be pegged on having alternate skills; such as creativity. The World Economic Forum recently released a list of the 10 most valuable skills employees should have to match job requirements in 2020. The top 3 skills are “Complex Problem Solving,” “Critical Thinking,” and “Creativity”. …


A new paradigm in Development Cooperation

The rapid advancement and drop in price of technologies such as internet and smartphones is having an tremendous impact on socio-economic development. This has lead to a new generation of tech-entrepreneurs who are delivering housing, education, electricity, healthcare, infrastructure etc. to the bottom of the pyramid — services and solutions to problems that was previously primarily the domain of large established NGO’s and Governments. These new tech driven developments are collectively referred to as “tech-velopment”. In this article we will briefly describe the key tenets of this paradigm and why it matters.

“Disruption” is all the…


Over the past year we have worked hard together with CINC to design and deliver a 13 day Leadership Development Program for Top Civil Servants of Estonia, Finland, UK and The Netherlands called “Creative Capacities and Digital Leadership”, with the aim of creating a more innovative, digitally competent and agile public sector. Check out the brief Executive Summary of the program to learn more. It can be found here.

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Creative Capacities and Digital Leadership

Over the past year we have worked hard to design and deliver a 13 day Leadership Development Program for Top Civil Servants of Estonia, Finland, UK and The Netherlands called “Creative Capacities and Digital Leadership”, with the aim of creating a more innovative, digitally competent and agile public sector. Check out the brief Executive Summary of the program to learn more. It can be found here: http://bit.ly/2vHNHhi

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Creative Capacities and Digital Leadership

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By Adrian Bertoli

The one thing businesses and employers all seem to agree on is that creativity is crucial for surviving and thriving in today’s business world. The catch is, there is more to fostering creativity in the workplace than rearranging the workspace with beanbag chairs and ping-pong tables. The key is to unlock the creative potential of individual employees.

The discussions around workplace began around the time when Google set the trend of ‘creative’ workspaces by developing an amusement park type workplace including twisty slides into their San Francisco headquarters in 2008 [1]. These types of perks are no doubt great, and will boost morale, but having a coffee bar, nap rooms and foosball tables won’t necessarily create the kind of workplace culture that encourages personal and strategic risk-taking, characteristics required for creativity to blossom[2]. …

About

Jacob Lennheden

Nomad, researcher, writer, social entrepreneur. I specialise in the intersection of technology and society. Helping decision-makers navigate uncertain futures.

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